Reptar

Additional

Language
Java
Version
2.5.0 (May 15, 2017)
Created
Dec 1, 2016
Updated
Dec 16, 2017
Owner
Commit 451 (Commit451)
Contributor
John Carlson (Jawnnypoo)
1
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Commercial

Reptar

Roaring RxJava. A collection of useful RxJava 2.X classes.

Gradle Dependency

Add the jitpack url to the project:

allprojects {
    repositories {
        ...
        maven { url "https://jitpack.io" }
    }
}

then, in your app build.gradle

dependencies {
    compile "com.github.Commit451.Reptar:reptar:latest.version.here"
    //for Retrofit support
    compile "com.github.Commit451.Reptar:reptar-retrofit:latest.version.here"
    //for Kotlin support
    compile "com.github.Commit451.Reptar:reptar-kotlin:latest.version.here"
}

Usage

Usage can be found in the sample project.

Observers

For instances where you only want to implement certain callbacks, use:

  • AdapterObserver
  • AdapterSingleObserver

Composable Observers

Often times, you want to subscribe to Observables and have certain rules surrounding the observers. For example, you may want to use a SingleObserver, but ignore any CancellationExceptions since your Activity or Fragment is probably destroyed when this exception is thrown. You could potentially override the Observer and do the check in the subclass. But, this can optional in tons of subclasses that all perform simple boolean checks.

ComposableSingleObserver and ComposableObserver make it simple to add checks on the success and failure of observers. For example:

someObservable
    .subscribe(new ComposableSingleObserver<Boolean>() {
        @Override
        public void success(Boolean aBoolean) {
            //do some success thing
        }

        @Override
        public void error(Throwable t) {
            //error block will never get CancellationExceptions
            onHandleError(t);
        }
    }.add(new CancellationFailureChecker()));

CancellationFailureChecker:

public class CancellationFailureChecker implements FailureChecker {

    @Override
    public boolean check(Throwable t) {
        return t instanceof CancellationException;
    }
}

You could also just create an abstract Observer that you use throughout the app that contains these rules so that you do not have to repeat them:

public abstract class CustomSingleObserver<T> extends ComposableSingleObserver<T> {

    public CustomSingleObserver() {
        add(new CancellationFailureChecker());
        //add other success and failure checks as desired
    }

}

See SuccessChecker and FailureChecker for more.

Avoiding Null

RxJava 2.x does not allow propagating null. Read more here. null is still something we may not want to have fall through into the onError block though. For instance, if we want to check if a value exists, we could say that null means no, and a valid value means yes.

As a replacement, we can use Optional. For example:

Optional<String> optional;
if (random.nextInt() % 2 == 0) {
    optional = new Optional<>("hi");
} else {
    optional = Optional.empty();
}
Single.just(optional)
        .subscribe(new ComposableSingleObserver<Optional<String>>() {
            @Override
            public void success(Optional<String> optional) {
                if (optional.hasValue()) {
                    Snackbar.make(root, "Has a optional", Snackbar.LENGTH_SHORT)
                            .show();
                } else {
                    Snackbar.make(root, "No optional", Snackbar.LENGTH_SHORT)
                            .show();
                }
            }

            @Override
            public void error(Throwable e) {
                //Note that an empty optional would not be an error
            }
        });

This is similar to an Optional in Guava

Retrofit Usage

For Retrofit, many times, you need to get the raw response from Retrofit, but you also want all non 2XX error codes to fall through to the onError(). For this, ResponseSingleObservable is perfect:

gitHub.contributors("square", "okhttp")
    .subscribe(new ResponseSingleObserver<List<Contributor>>() {
        @Override
        protected void responseSuccess(List<Contributor> contributors) {
            int responseCode = response().code();
            //do what you need to with the response
        }

        @Override
        public void error(Throwable e) {
            if (e instanceof HttpException) {
                //check the response code, do what you need to
            } else {
                //handle any other error
            }
        }
    });

Similarly, you can use ResponseFunction in replacement of Function to easily flatMap a optional without needing to worry about checking .isSuccessful() on the optional.

Kotlin Usage

Kotlin extensions allow for easy composition of Single and Observable for Android:

gitHub.contributors("jetbrains", "kotlin")
    .fromIoToMainThread()
    .subscribe(object : CustomSingleObserver<List<Contributor>>() {
        override fun success(t: List<Contributor>) {
            Snackbar.make(root, "It worked!", Snackbar.LENGTH_SHORT)
                    .show()
        }

        override fun error(t: Throwable) {
            onHandleError(t)
        }
    })

License

Copyright 2017 Commit 451

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at

   http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.