Fontain

Additional

Language
Java
Version
v1.0.0 (Sep 1, 2015)
Created
May 6, 2014
Updated
Sep 2, 2015
Owner
Scopely (scopely)
Contributors
mlc
PeterAttardo
2
Activity
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Fontain

Fontain is a lightweight library for displaying text in custom fonts in your Android applications

Features

Fontain allows you to include a number of custom fonts within your app, and then access them by their Font Family, Weight, Width and Slope. It simplifies the process of selecting the proper typeface for any given usage.

Usage

Gradle

compile 'com.scopely:fontain:1.0.0'

Setup

In order for Fontain to be able to make use of your custom fonts, they must be placed in the Assets folder, with the following directory structure:

assets  
  `--><font folder>  
    `--><font family name>
      `--><font>

Example:

-->assets  
 `--> fonts  
    |--> Helvetica
    | |--> Helvetica.otf
    | |--> Helvetica-UltraBold.otf
    | `--> Helvetica-Italic.otf
    `--> Garamond
      |--> Garamond.otf
      |--> Garamond-UltraBold.otf
      `--> Garamond-Italic.otf

The weight, width and slope information of a particular font will be parsed from its name, so any relevant descriptors must remain in the font name. "Helvetica.otf" will be assumed to have Normal weight, Normal width and not italic. "Helvetica-UltraBold-Italic.otf" will be treated as having UltraBold weight, Normal width and italic.

Initializing

You must initialize Fontain with a Context and the name of whatever font family you want to be the default.

Fontain must be initialized before it is used (including the inflation of any of Fontain's custom Font Views), so that it may create fonts from the assets folder, but it need only be initialized once.

Fontain can be initialized with any one of the overloaded init methods:

Fontain.init(Context context, String fontsFolder, String defaultFontName)
Fontain.init(Context context, String defaultFontName)
Fontain.init(Context context)

Your application's onCreate() method is the recommended place to initialize Fontain.

Usage

Fontain can be used primarily in one of two ways:

Font Views

Fontain provides a number of Font Views that are extended from Android's basic text views ( TextView => FontTextView, Button => FontButton, etc). You can use these views exactly as you would use the regular android version, and on creation they will seek out the default Typeface from Fontain and apply it to themselves. Additionally these views come with custom XML attributes that allow you to specify the Font Family, Weight, Width and/or Caps Mode directly in layout XML (Slope is taken from Android's native TextStyle attribute). Example usage:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content">
  <com.scopely.fontain.views.FontTextView
      android:layout_width="wrap_content"
      android:layout_height="wrap_content"
      android:text="Text"
      android:textStyle="italic"
      app:font_family="Helvetica"
      app:font_weight="ULTRA_BOLD"
      app:font_width="NARROW"
      app:caps_mode="words"/>
</LinearLayout>
Caps Mode

All of the Font Views include the ability to set a Caps Mode. Doing so will initialize the view with a TransformationMethod that will display the text of the view with certain letters capitalized. Caps Mode characters will capitalize all letters, Caps Mode words will capitalize the first letter of each word, and Caps Mode sentences will capitalize the first letter of each sentence. Caps Mode title is equivalent to words except that certain words, such as 'a', 'of', etc, are not capitalized*. Caps Mode is analagous to, and is implemented with, Android's TextUtils.CAP_MODE_XXXXX, but with more granular control in xml than merely android:textAllCaps.

\Caps Mode title is only applicable to English. In non-'en' locales, Caps Mode title will behave the same as Caps Mode words.*

Apply to View Hierarchy

Fontain also contains methods for walking a view hierarchy and applying a given typeface to any TextView contained therein. Fontain provides several overloaded methods that achieve the same thing:

Fontain.applyFontToViewHierarchy(View root, int weight, int width, boolean italic)
Fontain.applyFontToViewHierarchy(View root, FontFamily fontFamily, int weight, int width, boolean italic)
Fontain.applyFontToViewHierarchy(View root, Font font)

Fontain also has a method that will apply a font family across a view hierarchy. Whereas the above methods will apply a single font to all views in the hierarchy, the below method will select the font that best matches the view's pre-existing weight, width and slope attributes.

Fontain.applyFontFamilyToViewHierarchy(View root, FontFamily family)

Similar to the above two methods, there is also a method to apply a TransformationMethod (such as one of the caps modes) to a View hierarchy:

Fontain.applyTransformationToViewHierarchy(View root, TransformationMethod)

The use case for these methods is generally when the layout in question is provided by the system (eg: AlertDialog) or a third party library (eg: https://github.com/JakeWharton/Android-ViewPagerIndicator)

Each of these methods also has an overloaded version that takes a Predicate<TextView> that allows you to introspect each TextView in the hierarchy and return true to apply the Font/FontFamily/TransformationMethod, or false to skip the TextView in question.

Spans

Fontain also provides the following spans that allow you to change font within a single TextView:

FontSpan: applies a specified typeface to the spanned text
WidthSpan: does a reverse lookup of the text's current typeface and then finds a font in the same font family with the specified width
WeightSpan: does a reverse lookup of the text's current typeface and then finds a font in the same font family with the specified weight
SlopeSpan: does a reverse lookup of the text's current typeface and then finds a font in the same font family with the specified slope.

These spans all extend MetricAffectingSpan are applied in the same manner as sibling classes such as RelativeSizeSpan and SubscriptSpan.

Definitions

Weight

The weight of a font is its thickness. Bold is the classic descriptor related to weight, but there are many more, and all correspond to a numerical value on a scale that ranges from 100 to 900. The names and numerical values used by Fontain are listed below:

HAIRLINE: 100
THIN: 100
ULTRA_LIGHT: 100 
EXTRA_LIGHT: 100
LIGHT: 200
BOOK: 300
NORMAL: 400
MEDIUM: 500
DEMI_BOLD: 600
SEMI_BOLD: 600
BOLD: 700
EXTRA_BOLD: 800
HEAVY: 800
BLACK: 800
ULTRA_HEAVY: 900
EXTRA_BLACK: 900
ULTRA_BLACK: 900
ULTRA_BOLD: 900
FAT: 900
POSTER: 900

Width

The width of a font is the the horizontal space taken up by each letter relative to the letter's height. There are commonly accepted descriptors, but no standard numerical value the way there is with weight. Fontain simply maps the descriptors to a 1-5 scale. The names used by Fontain are listed below:

ULTRA_COMPRESSED: 1
EXTRA_COMPRESSED: 1
ULTRA_CONDENSED: 1
EXTRA_CONDENSED: 1
ULTRA_NARROW: 1
EXTRA_NARROW: 1
COMPRESSED: 2
CONDENSED: 2
NARROW: 2
NORMAL: 3
WIDE: 4
EXTENDED: 4
EXPANDED: 4
EXTRA_WIDE: 5
ULTRA_WIDE: 5
EXTRA_EXTENDED: 5
ULTRA_EXTENDED: 5
EXTRA_EXPANDED: 5
ULTRA_EXPANDED: 5

Slope

The slope of a font is the angle at which the presumably vertical elements of the font rest. In Fontain this is a simple boolean: the font is either Normal or it is Italic.