RxLoading

Additional

Language
Java
Version
N/A
Created
Oct 1, 2017
Updated
Jun 10, 2018
Owner
ndori
Contributor
ndori
1
Activity
Badge
Generate
Download
Source code

Advertising

RxLoading

RxJava library for showing a loading (i.e. progress bar) state while waiting for async data with minimal effort and advanced options.

TL;DR; in your xml:

<com.ndori.loading.LoadingLayout
 android:id="@+id/loadingLayout"
 android:layout_width="match_parent"
 android:layout_height="match_parent">

<LinearLayout android:layout_width="match_parent"
              android:layout_height="match_parent">
    <!--....-->
</LinearLayout>
</com.ndori.loading.LoadingLayout>

in your java code:

networkCall().compose(RxLoading.<>create(loadingLayout)).subscribe(...);

and you are done!

RxLoading will bind "loadingLayout" to your network call stream when the stream is subscribed the layout will move to "loading" state, once an item arrives the loading is done.

This is the simplest and most frequently occurring flow, but RxLoading supports much more.

This library is made of 2 components:

  • LoadingLayout - a View which can be used to hide all or some of other views while it shows a progress bar.
    • Error View- shows a view in case some error has occurred, can have a retry button and can be fully customized for your needs.
    • Empty View - like error view in case you want to show something else when there is no data.
    • Can wrap other views it wishes to hide or can hide sibling views (white/blacklist).
    • Have some fine-grained configuration for other needs (e.g. support multi-users, show blank instead of progress bar...).
    • Completely decoupled from RxJava, I might release it as a separate library if there will be a request for it.
  • RxLoading - A RxJava Transformer which takes care of all the binding logic and gives a generic way to incorporate it into most of the streams out there.
    • Can be altered to be used with any progress component out there (e.g. SwipeRefreshLayout..).
    • You can choose to set the "loading state" by action (i.e. subscribe, next, error...) or by the emitted item (e.g. if a list is empty - set "Empty" state).
    • You can also customize the view by the emitted item (e.g. if has error show "Error" state with a specific getErrorMessage() ).
    • Plays well with finite and infinite streams.
    • Supports multiple streams with one layout, and also multiple layouts with one stream.
    • You can use retry logic seamlessly, it will resubscribe to the stream in case of a retry button being hit.
    • And even more fine-grained options...

Download

make sure you are using Jcenter as a repository

dependencies {
  compile 'com.ndori.rxloading:rxloading:0.9'
}

LoadingLayout Usage

Some of it's features are listed above, let's see how we use it.

its basic functionality is the ability to hide and show other views, so while we load a page we can only show the relevant parts, hide the rest and when the data is ready we can show the views.

wrap it:

<com.ndori.loading.LoadingLayout
 android:id="@+id/loadingLayout"
 android:layout_width="match_parent"
 android:layout_height="match_parent">

<LinearLayout android:layout_width="match_parent"
              android:layout_height="match_parent">
    <!--....-->
</LinearLayout>
</com.ndori.loading.LoadingLayout>

LoadingLayout is extending FrameLayout, so it can simply wrap the views you don't want to show yet. This method is good enough for most cases but has some drawbacks, yet another view hierarchy, in android we try to flatten our layouts as much as possible. it shows/ hides all, sometimes we only want to hide certain views.

Reference views:

<android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content">

    <com.ndori.loading.LoadingLayout
        app:layout_constraintRight_toRightOf="parent"
        app:referencedIds="description, link"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"/>

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/description"
        app:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintRight_toRightOf="parent"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/link"
        app:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintRight_toRightOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintTop_toBottomOf="@+id/description"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/cancel"
        app:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintRight_toRightOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintTop_toBottomOf="@+id/description"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />
</android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout>

Inspired by Barriers in ConstraintLayout, you can reference a list of view ids which will indicate which views to control. In the above example while the screen is in loading state the 2 text views will be hidden but the button will be shown. This behavior cannot be achieved with a simple wrap if "link", "description" and "cancel" need to constrain each other as they all need to be direct children of constraintLayout. related attributes you can use:

  • string referencedIds - list of ids to control, in the format of "id, id, ..."
  • boolean referenceSiblings - if set to true it will hide/show all it sibling, instead of using referenced_ids one by one.
  • boolean invertReferencedIds - used with referenceSiblings, if true referencedIds will act as a white list of views not to control.

Using referenceSiblings you can get the same effect as a wrap but without the overhead.

Other from that we got some more attributes to control the loading behavior:

  • boolean progressBarVisibility - if set to false loading state will just be an invisible layout hiding other layouts.
  • int initSetStateDelayMilliseconds - default is 200, this is meant to prevent flickers, it will only set the initial state after this delay, in case of a very quick request we will not see the loading view that way.
  • boolean forceDoneVisibility - by default when loading occurs it will save a snapshot of the visibility state of each view and will set it back upon completion. if set, it will set the visibility of all controlled views to Visible, one scenario could be in order to prevent flickering, you will set all the views to be hidden by default and it will make sure to make them visible when done.

Error and Empty States loadingLayout can be set to 4 different states, we already covered "done" and "loading" states which are the main functionality. but what happens if we have some error in the process? or we got a special state that we want to show different view? loadingLayout got 2 default views which will probably fit most cases, they contain an image, a description, and a button to take some action, it will usually be "retry" for error and some call to action in the empty state. there are some attributes which let you modify this screens slightly:

  • drawable noDataImage - image for the empty state, you can also null it to remove it.
  • string noDataText - description for the empty state, you can remove it as well.
  • string noDataActionText - the text for the button in an empty state, if set no button will be shown.
  • drawable failImage - image for the error state, you can also null it to remove it. //TODO: add it.
  • string failText - description of the error state, you can remove it as well.
  • string failActionText - the text for the button in error state, if set no button will be shown. //TODO: rename it.
  • boolean failActionEnabled - can be used to disable the button and not show it.

To have even more control you can also completely replace the layout for each of the states, keep in mind that unless you define the same ids for the views some functionality might not work (e.g. if it can't find the fail action id then it wouldn't be able to disable it).

  • layout customLoadingStateLayout - set it to replace the progress bar.
  • layout customNoDataStateLayout - for the empty state.
  • layout customLoadingFailedStateLayout- for the error state.

some code is needed in order to change its state, add listeners etc. although you can use it without RxLoading (and in some scenarios, you might want to) it is advised to let RxLoading handle the heavy lifting, you can scroll down to find how to use on your own

RxLoading Usage

Some of its features are listed above, let's see how we use it.

networkCall().compose(RxLoading.<>create(loadingLayout)).subscribe(...);

This class contains the logic for attaching the loadingLayout to a stream, it will take care of setting the states and even alter the views when needed, as such it needs to know loadingLayout internal, instead it only interacts with an interface called ILoadingLayout which loadingLayout implement, and by implementing this interface yourself you can make RxLoading interact with any progress component out there.

It does not have many options by itself, but it will alter its behavior by the underlay ILoadingLayout
The simplest usage as seen in the introduction. is to call create(ILoadingLayout ILoadingLayout) and compose it with the Rx stream which handles the layout data.

the basic behavior you will get is as follows:

  • Loading state is set up upon onSubscribe
  • LoadingFailed state is set up upon onError
  • NoData state is set up upon onCompleted or unsubscribe only if was still in loading state (there was no item arrived or there was an error)
  • LoadingDone state is set each time an item is emitted, however, only the first item will actually make an impact (unless you are changing the state of the ILoadingLayout manually)

RxLoading supports retry() of the entire stream and will retry if these conditions are met:

  1. ILoadingLayout has enabled the failActionEnabled attribute (enabled by default) and has an actual text (exists as "retry" by default).
  2. An error has happened and RxLoading has moved the state to LoadingFailed.
  3. The user has pressed the failAction/retry button.

But wait, there is more! clearly, this simple scenario isn't enough, what if we got an error in the emitted item, or what if the emitted item is a list and we want to show a NoData state when it's empty? and what if the emitted item can have several different errors and we want to show a different message for each?

enters IStateProvider and IConfigurationProvider

IStateProvider

this is the more simple provider - when an item is emitted the provider is being called and returns a state. for example, let's say we emit an Integer, a positive number is valid, zero means a special NoData state, and a negative number is...you guessed it an error. all you need to do is add the following:

class IntegerStateProvider implements IStateProvider<Integer>{
    @Override
    public LoadingState nextState(Integer integer) {
        return  integer > 0 ? LoadingState.DONE : 
                integer < 0 ? LoadingState.LOADING_FAIL:
                              LoadingState.NO_DATA;
    }
    @Override
    public String getFailedMessage(Integer integer) {
        return "you got an invalid number=" + integer; //different message for error
    }
    @Override
    public Boolean isRetryEnabled(Integer integer) {
        return integer < -10; //only integers below -10 is retryable
    }
}

and use it:

compose(RxLoading.<>create(loadingLayout).setStateProvider(new IntegerStateProvider()))

Before implementing your own be sure to checkout DefaultIStateProvider , CollectionStateProvider and MapStateProvider

IConfigurationProvider

for most cases IStateProvider will be enough, but if you need more control you can use the lower level IConfigurationProvider

instead of returning a LoadingState, you will now need to return an ILoadingStateConfiguration for each item emitted. ILoadingStateConfiguration will be called getting the ILoadingLayout itself, so it can actually modify it for whatever it likes for each emitted item. The reason for the indirection is that while the Configuration can be calculated in another thread the modification of the IloadingLayout must run on the main UI thread.

I recommend using StateProvider when possible and only use ConfigurationProvider when you must.

Advanced Usage

Subscribing before Views are created

For most cases the simple usage will suffice, but what if we want to make a network call when a screen opens, a fragment has onCreate and onCreateView methods, we must attach the ILoadingLayout after it exists (which is only after onCreateView has been called) but we want to make the network call ASAP, before we render the screen so we want to call it in onCreate or even before.

We must compose RxLoading when the network is subscribed meaning in onCreate, but at that stage, the views are not ready yet, so loadingLayout will still be null. moreover, there is a race here, between the rendering of the view and the return of the network call. RxLoading can take care of it, but we need a little more code for it.

public class MyFragment extends Fragment {
    private RxLoading<Integer> rxLoading;
    @Override
    public void onCreate(@Nullable Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        rxLoading = RxLoading.create();
        networkCall().compose(rxLoading).subscribe(...);
    }
    @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, @Nullable ViewGroup container, @Nullable Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        View root = inflater.inflate(R.layout.fragment_layout, container);
        ILoadingLayout loadingLayout = (ILoadingLayout) root.findViewById(R.id.loadingLayout);
        rxLoading.bind(loadingLayout);
        ...
        return root;
    }
}

Rxloading will remember the state ILoadingLayout should be in and will set it once we bind it.

Making sure the subscribe code of networkCall will run after onCreateView is out of this scope (hint RxLifecycle).

2 Streams one LoadingLayout

if we want several loadingLayout for to react to one stream it is easy, just create RxLoading instance for each LoadingLayout and compose each of them.

networkCall().compose(RxLoading.<>create(loadingLayout1)).compose(RxLoading.<>create(loadingLayout2)).compose(RxLoading.<>create(loadingLayout3)).subscribe(...);

But what about the other direction? let's say we want one loadingLayout that covers the entire screen, but the data for that screen is actually composed out of 3 different network request? Well, this is a job for loadingLayout, it supports multiple states when you set a state for it you need to pass an id. loadingLayout will then decide it state by combining all those states by priority: LoadingFailed >> Loading >> NoData >> Done. It's enough there is one failure to make loadingLayout show it has failed, all states must be Done in order for it to be in that state and so on... How you take care of it with RxLoading? it will take care of it for you, each RxLoading defines a different id so you can compose several RxLoading instances with a single LoadingLayout, cheers.

networkCall1().compose(RxLoading.<>create(loadingLayout)).subscribe(...);
networkCall2().compose(RxLoading.<>create(loadingLayout)).subscribe(...);
networkCall3().compose(RxLoading.<>create(loadingLayout)).subscribe(...);

ILoadingLayout logic side

As I stated before, you can use LoadingLayout without RxLoading, for that ILoadingLayout exposes several methods to interact with (which RxLoading use), an example of usage can be a screen or logic which you don't use rxJava yet.

  • setState is the most important one, and as the name suggest you can change loadingLayout state. you should also consider it multi variant which accepts a unique id as well.
  • addOnFailedActionButtonClickListener/ removeOnFailedActionButtonClickListener are pretty straight forward.
  • setOnNoDataActionListener as well.

For example:

public class MyFragment extends Fragment {

    @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, @Nullable ViewGroup container, @Nullable Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        View root = inflater.inflate(R.layout.fragment_layout, container);
        ILoadingLayout loadingLayout = (ILoadingLayout) root.findViewById(R.id.loadingLayout);
        loadingLayout.setOnNoDataActionListener((view) -> closeScreen());
        askForData();
        ...
        return root;
    }

 public void askForData(){
  loadingLayout.setState(LoadingState.LOADING);
  ...
 }

 public void onDataArrived(Integer integer){
  if (integer < 0){
      if ( integer < -10){
       final OnClickListener listener = (view)->{
     askForData();
     loadingLayout.removeOnFailedActionButtonClickListener(listener);
    }
    loadingLayout.addOnFailedActionButtonClickListener(listener);
   }
   loadingLayout.setState(LoadingState.LOADING_FAIL);
   }
   return;
  }
  loadingLayout.setState(LoadingState.DONE);
  ...
 }
}

is something missing? got any questions? found a mistake? don't hesitate to contact me or open an issue.